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[The number of girls taking online classes is small]

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Rabindra Dhungel, 20 august 2020. Students’ access to online education has been low as parents are worried that their daughters will be spoiled if they are allowed to use mobile phones with internet. Discrimination among children still exists in Nepali society. It may come as a surprise to hear that such thinking is also present in the parents of urban areas like Kathmandu Metropolitan City.

 

But it is real. The student’s participation in the online class, which was started due to the risk of corona infection, has revealed such a secret. It has been seen that the access of students to online education has not reached as expected as the parents are thinking that their daughters will be spoiled if they are allowed to use mobile phones with net.

A total of 86 students participated in the online class for students of class 10 at Vishwaniketan School in Tripureshwor on Monday. Among them, 58.13 percent are male students and 41.86 percent are female students, said Principal Herambaraj Kandel. After the class, he said, “Parents should ask their daughter to buy a mobile phone that runs on the internet. When I remind them, they say that they can read the book. ‘He said that it is sad to meet parents who think that stopping their son’s studies will ruin the world and that it will not affect their daughter’s studies.

Rajni Yadav, mother of a class 9 student at Vishwaniketan, said that she would not give her daughter a mobile phone with net. ‘Today I came to school to get a book. The daughter learns by reading books until the school opens, ‘she said,’ I don’t give a mobile phone with net. Going the wrong way is bad for the family. ‘

Rajni Yadav, mother of a class 9 student at Vishwaniketan, said that she would not give her daughter a mobile phone with net. ‘Today I came to school to get a book. The daughter learns by reading books until the school opens, ‘she said,’ I don’t give a mobile phone with net. Going the wrong way is bad for the family. ‘

Susmita Shrestha’s father, who lives in Kalanki, gave his mobile phone set to his son, who is studying in class 8, for online classes. But Susmita did not find it. Susmita was devastated by her parents’ behavior. ‘Brother’s class starts at 10 a.m., ends at 1:30 p.m. My brother is reading online, ‘said Susmita,’ but my parents have not allowed me to use my mobile phone alone till now. They have doubts that I will chat with my boyfriend. ‘ He is a student of Balambu Mavic.

Susmita’s mother Vimala gave her daughter a mobile phone with net and used Facebook as an excuse for online classes and expressed fears that she would get spoiled by chatting with her boyfriend. “I haven’t heard of girls using Facebook, KK caste on their mobiles,” she said in response to a query from a citizen.

Not only discrimination in studies, but also help the daughters in their work while staying at home during the lockdown. Mahima Pandey, a class 9 student of Jana Prabhat School in Kalimati, says, “Parents go out in the morning to trade in the Kalimati vegetable market.” I prepare food, lunch and dinner. My brother reads. ‘Mahima, 14, added,’ We two sisters do the housework. Has a brother The father tells her to let him study. ‘She says that no matter how much the daughters study in his house, he would go to someone else’s house and the brother would look after his parents in old age.

 

Suman Raut, principal of Balambu Mavic, said that parents in urban areas who are in poor financial condition have discriminated more against their sons and daughters. At present, 870 students are enrolled in his school. He said he had conducted a study on the availability of the net and children’s access to online content. “Forty percent of parents do not have access to online reading,” he said. However, our study has shown that if parents have mobiles, net, laptop, table and other materials, then the son is the priority. ‘ “From school choice to creating a learning environment, there is discrimination against daughters,” he added.

Natikaji Maharjan, headmaster of Gyanodaya School, said that the participation of female students was low even though the schools were conducting online classes after the government issued guidelines for teaching through alternative means. Manju Shrestha, a teacher at Shanti Nikunj Mavic, also told the students that her sons had mobile phones and their daughters did not have access to them. “I found the participation of daughters to be very low when I was teaching students from the online classroom,” said the English teacher. But it is the parents who prevent the daughters from accessing the net and mobile phones. ‘

 

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